Comments for KnowledgeThoughtsBlog http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog Just another WordPress weblog Mon, 30 Nov 2009 21:45:58 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.4.2 Comment on Here’s Waving at you kid by Neil Richards http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=389&cpage=1#comment-1123 Neil Richards Mon, 30 Nov 2009 21:45:58 +0000 http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=389#comment-1123 I'm sorry, but I'm all out of Wave invites. I’m sorry, but I’m all out of Wave invites.

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Comment on Here’s Waving at you kid by Margaret Merrick http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=389&cpage=1#comment-1117 Margaret Merrick Thu, 26 Nov 2009 15:13:33 +0000 http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=389#comment-1117 I'd like a wave too if you still have one left! Regards, Margaret Merrick, Knowledge Manager A&L Goodbody Solicitors, International Financial Services Centre, I North Wall Quay, Dublin 1, Ireland I’d like a wave too if you still have one left!

Regards,
Margaret Merrick, Knowledge Manager

A&L Goodbody Solicitors, International Financial Services Centre, I North Wall Quay, Dublin 1, Ireland

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Comment on Here’s Waving at you kid by John Gillies http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=389&cpage=1#comment-1021 John Gillies Fri, 16 Oct 2009 20:54:41 +0000 http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=389#comment-1021 I'd certainly be interested in an invitation, Neil, if you have any left. Thanks, John I’d certainly be interested in an invitation, Neil, if you have any left.
Thanks, John

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Comment on Here’s Waving at you kid by Mark Gould http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=389&cpage=1#comment-1015 Mark Gould Thu, 15 Oct 2009 07:28:55 +0000 http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=389#comment-1015 Neil, For some reason, Google have completely forgotten to send me a Wave invitation. If you still have a spare one, can you send it my way? Thanks, Mark. Neil,

For some reason, Google have completely forgotten to send me a Wave invitation. If you still have a spare one, can you send it my way?

Thanks,
Mark.

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Comment on Here’s Waving at you kid by Mark http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=389&cpage=1#comment-1014 Mark Thu, 15 Oct 2009 06:08:22 +0000 http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=389#comment-1014 If you still have any Wave invites left I would be delighted if you would share one with me. I work at a dutch law firm and very eager to start experimenting with Wave. If you still have any Wave invites left I would be delighted if you would share one with me. I work at a dutch law firm and very eager to start experimenting with Wave.

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Comment on My favourite tweets from KM Australia 09 – Day 1 (feat @awmitchell, @kdelarue, @michellelamb and others) by Johannes http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=366&cpage=1#comment-1005 Johannes Sat, 10 Oct 2009 11:26:55 +0000 http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=366#comment-1005 Metablogging tweets? I'm just looking for serious KM blogs. This practice of re-listing "favourite tweets" is seemingly beeing adopted quite a lot these days. But I have yet to encounter another blog doing it on a scale like you did with those posts. Please. Don't do it. Write a summary and hide it in the jump. Or don't do it at all. Thanks for listening. Metablogging tweets?
I’m just looking for serious KM blogs.
This practice of re-listing “favourite tweets” is seemingly beeing adopted quite a lot these days. But I have yet to encounter another blog doing it on a scale like you did with those posts.
Please. Don’t do it.
Write a summary and hide it in the jump.
Or don’t do it at all.
Thanks for listening.

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Comment on If Sharepoint is the solution, what is the problem? Part II/II by Lee http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=373&cpage=1#comment-978 Lee Mon, 21 Sep 2009 08:26:56 +0000 http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=373#comment-978 Thanks Neil, there are certainly use cases for structured data, and maybe some of those are good Sharepoint cases. But even there we have other tools to play with, like IBM's QEDWiki or simple tools like Socialcalc or other collab spreadsheets and DBs. But I would think this is a good area in which to find the elusive SP value argument! (grab me a truffle while you are there, will you? ;-) Thanks Neil,

there are certainly use cases for structured data, and maybe some of those are good Sharepoint cases. But even there we have other tools to play with, like IBM’s QEDWiki or simple tools like Socialcalc or other collab spreadsheets and DBs. But I would think this is a good area in which to find the elusive SP value argument! (grab me a truffle while you are there, will you? ;-)

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Comment on If Sharepoint is the solution, what is the problem? Part II/II by Neil Richards http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=373&cpage=1#comment-977 Neil Richards Sun, 20 Sep 2009 23:15:20 +0000 http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=373#comment-977 Hi Lee, First, thanks you for the comment. There isn't much to disagree with. As a social platform both Confluence and SocialText trump SharePoint. No question. Sharepoint's MySite is a poor second cousin to Newsgator's Social Sites, and you were kind enough to refrain from mentioning ConnectBeam or Cogenz. I had to smile at the word "voluntarily". I do wonder about the use-cases that call for structure. What are your thoughts on classic relational databases? Should they be built using ad-hoc wiki structures or inadequate Sharepoint lists? I don't see native Sharepoint or wikis as being suitable. I do however, see the underlying Sharepoint platform (features, webparts, etc.) as offering some pretty useful features. Does that justify the cost? Probably not for a specific application, but across the entire suite of tools for an organisation, it might just. Hi Lee,

First, thanks you for the comment. There isn’t much to disagree with. As a social platform both Confluence and SocialText trump SharePoint. No question. Sharepoint’s MySite is a poor second cousin to Newsgator’s Social Sites, and you were kind enough to refrain from mentioning ConnectBeam or Cogenz. I had to smile at the word “voluntarily”.

I do wonder about the use-cases that call for structure. What are your thoughts on classic relational databases? Should they be built using ad-hoc wiki structures or inadequate Sharepoint lists? I don’t see native Sharepoint or wikis as being suitable. I do however, see the underlying Sharepoint platform (features, webparts, etc.) as offering some pretty useful features.

Does that justify the cost? Probably not for a specific application, but across the entire suite of tools for an organisation, it might just.

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Comment on If Sharepoint is the solution, what is the problem? Part II/II by Lee http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=373&cpage=1#comment-974 Lee Wed, 16 Sep 2009 15:54:16 +0000 http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=373#comment-974 Thanks Neil. I would just perhaps take issue with a couple of things: "Sharepoint out of the box is not sufficient to solve the needs of most firms, in the same way that a vanilla wiki / blog / search engine is not sufficient" - Not sure this is true. A plain wiki is very flexible and imposes no a priori structure on users, so they can evolve their own strategy and structure for its use. This is not true for SP, which is an over-structured basic DMS with a few trimmings. That's why you find plenty of personal blog and wiki sites on the net, being used for different things, but you will not find people voluntarily using Sharepoint. Also, if Bob thinks the licensing cost (or - God forbid - he tries customisation) of SP is cheap or good value, then he is mistaken ;-) He should look at Confluence or Socialtext or one of the other social business platforms. If, however, Bob bought SP for other reasons (perhaps he got a really, really good license deal) then I would be advising him to integrate Newsgator's Social Sites product or Confluence to develop a genuinely useful social platform and not waste any money on the painful path of native SP development. Thanks Neil.

I would just perhaps take issue with a couple of things:

“Sharepoint out of the box is not sufficient to solve the needs of most firms, in the same way that a vanilla wiki / blog / search engine is not sufficient” – Not sure this is true. A plain wiki is very flexible and imposes no a priori structure on users, so they can evolve their own strategy and structure for its use. This is not true for SP, which is an over-structured basic DMS with a few trimmings. That’s why you find plenty of personal blog and wiki sites on the net, being used for different things, but you will not find people voluntarily using Sharepoint.

Also, if Bob thinks the licensing cost (or – God forbid – he tries customisation) of SP is cheap or good value, then he is mistaken ;-) He should look at Confluence or Socialtext or one of the other social business platforms. If, however, Bob bought SP for other reasons (perhaps he got a really, really good license deal) then I would be advising him to integrate Newsgator’s Social Sites product or Confluence to develop a genuinely useful social platform and not waste any money on the painful path of native SP development.

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Comment on If Sharepoint is the solution, what is the problem? Part II/II by Patrick Thomas http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=373&cpage=1#comment-972 Patrick Thomas Tue, 15 Sep 2009 13:07:47 +0000 http://www.knowledgethoughts.com/blog/?p=373#comment-972 Agree, your last sentence says it all: if you have an extensive need to manage structured data, a custom database app is the way to go. For all other kinds of unstructured information management, Wiki's are unbeatable IMHO in terms of flexibility, operating costs and administrative overhead. Some Wikis such as our telepark.wiki allow developers to develop and deploy database applications within the Wiki itself, holding structured and unstructured data management under one roof. Check Wikimatrix for an excellent overview of Wikis available on the market. Agree, your last sentence says it all: if you have an extensive need to manage structured data, a custom database app is the way to go. For all other kinds of unstructured information management, Wiki’s are unbeatable IMHO in terms of flexibility, operating costs and administrative overhead. Some Wikis such as our telepark.wiki allow developers to develop and deploy database applications within the Wiki itself, holding structured and unstructured data management under one roof. Check Wikimatrix for an excellent overview of Wikis available on the market.

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